Wine lovers know that mature often trumps new. With age, things acquire character, and that’s true of the crates that wine comes in as much as the wine itself. Certainly, vintage wines crates can look very impressive in a livingroom. However finding a good crate can be as difficult as sourcing a decent bottle of wine, and you have to take into account whether you want the genuine article or something new that’s been made to look old. Here’s our guide.

 

4 Places to Buy Vintage Wine Crates

There are lots of places to buy vintage wine crates online. The offerings of these sites range in quality as well as authenticity, but you can pick up a decent looking box for around €20:

 

  1. Ebay. You can buy everything on ebay. A simple for search for vintage wine crates returns over 300 results, which range from the authentic real deal to those described as ‘shabby chic’.
  2. Vintagecratesuk.co.uk. There are a few specialist websites which jonly sell vintage wine crates. This quirky British site even allows you to personalise a crate, and it specialises in American soft drink brands.
  3. Antiquecrates.com. This supplier is a bit more authentic. Some of the crates are actually over a hundred years old, but as they provide the real article, genuine vintage wine crates are a little on the scarce side. Again, there are more soft drink brands in their offering.
  4. Etsy.com. There are a lot of vintage wine crates on this site, and they all look convincing. Better yet, they seem to be better quality than Ebay while still being affordable.

 

Make Your Own “Vintage” Wine Crate

This is a great option if you fancy a DIY project for an afternoon. Of course, if you want to produce something more cheaply than an online supplier, you’ll need to keep costs low.

 

  1. Buy or find an ordinary wooden crate. Good places to find one for free include large city markets with butchers, fishmongers and greengrocers, or you could try garden centres. Furniture suppliers might also have a few knocking around. Ironically, most off licences get their wines delivered in cardboard boxes these days. Though if you’re really struggling, timber merchants sell them.
  2. Mark the crate with a vineyard’s insignia. First of all, find a bold, old looking logo with a simple design that you want emblazoned on the wood, which you could get from the wine labels which we stock in our shop. Either save an image file of the logo or take a photo of it, and after changing the size of the logo in a design programme, print it out. Carefully, cut the dark parts of the logo out. Use this as a stencil for harder cardboard, and then place the stencil on a flat, prominent area of the crate. Fix the stencil in place with masking tape, and use black paint to create the logo.
  3. Distress the wood. You don’t need to hurt its feelings with mean insults. Just leave it outside in the rain for a few weeks, or if you want faster results, beat the wood’s surface lightly with chains, nails, a hammer, or ball bearings in a sock. Then stain the wood with a lightly coloured solution. You could try leaving iron wool in a jar of white vinegar, and when the wool has dissolved, paint the solution onto the wood. Hey presto – instant authentic wine crate.

 

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