Jerez de la Frontera, in the province of Cadiz, was elected European Wine City 2014 at the 17th Recevin General Assembly (European Network of Wine Cities). Jerez de la Frontera took the baton from the Portuguese city of Palmela and Italian Marsala, home of the first and Second Edition.

Jerez stood out for for its 7,000 hectares of vineyards and a production of 60 million bottles a year, presuming to be Spain’s most exported wines.

Wine cellar "La Concha"

Wine cellar “La Concha”

The history of Jerez is intimately bound to the vine, to the production and elaboration of wines, and probably we could not understand one without the other. It is a very unique, singular area, for its geographic situation between the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, and for its intense rainfalls for 30 days on a yearly average. This unusual combination results in a few special features when it comes to winemaking.

The typology ranges from the dry and pale, like Fino or Manzanilla, to Amontillados, Pedro Ximénez, Moscatel, Medium, Cream, Oloroso and Palo Cortado. Sherry Vinegar and Brandy de Jerez are also produced in this area.

Wine Cellar “Real Tesoro y Valdespino”

The wines are cellared in some of the most impressive bodegas in Jerez, known as the cathedrals of wine, and also Europe’s most visited. These wineries were the first to open doors to visitors in the 19th century. They are located in the heart of the old city center and they are part of the landscape of the city.

Finally we’d like to recommend a good wine from this land: Fino la Ina. A fortified wine, made from Palomino grapes at Bodegas Lustau. Its colour is pale gold, dry in flavour and very aromatic. It is best served cold and has an alcohol content around 15 degrees. It is recommended as an aperitif to accompany ham, seafood or any kind of tapas.

Photos: www.cadizturismo.com and Ignacio Palomo